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Critical Incident Stress Management

Description

Helpers are often deeply affected by their work, especially critical incidents that can cause unusually strong emotional reactions. It is very common for staff to experience emotional aftershocks when they have experienced a difficult event. Sometimes the emotional aftershocks (or stress reactions) appear immediately after the traumatic event, and sometimes they may appear a few hours or days later. The signs and symptoms of a stress reaction may last a few days, a few weeks, a few months, or longer, depending on the severity of the incident. This class helps to normalize and understand this reaction and improves a person’s ability to manage it and know if/when to reach out for more help. We walk through the steps of a Critical Incident Debriefing as endorsed by the International Critical Incident Stress Foundation.

Learning Objectives

  • Defining a Critical Incident

  • Examining typical stress reactions and their effects

  • How and when to conduct a debriefing

  • How and when to conduct a defusing

Board Accreditation

MN Board of Social Work

2.0 CEUs (CEP-275)

MN Board of Nursing

This activity has been designed to meet the Minnesota Board of Nursing continuing education requirements. However, the nurse is responsible for determining whether this activity meets the requirements for acceptable continuing education.

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